Holiday Safety Tips for Pets

Holly, Jolly and Oh-So-Safe! Of course you want to include your furry companions in the festivities, pet parents, but as you celebrate this holiday season, try to keep your pet’s eating and exercise habits as close to their normal routine as possible. And be sure to steer them clear of the following unhealthy treats, toxic plants and dangerous decorations:

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O Christmas Tree Securely anchor your Christmas tree so it doesn’t tip and fall, causing possible injury to your pet. This will also prevent the tree water—which may contain fertilizers that can cause stomach upset—from spilling. Stagnant tree water is a breeding ground for bacteria and your pet could end up with nausea or diarrhea should he imbibe.

 

Tinsel-less Town
Kitties love this sparkly, light-catching “toy” that’s easy to bat around and carry in their mouths. But a nibble can lead to a swallow, which can lead to an obstructed digestive tract, severe vomiting, dehydration and possible surgery. It’s best to brighten your boughs with something other than tinsel.

 

No Feasting for the Furries
By now you know not to feed your pets chocolate and anything sweetened with xylitol, but do you know the lengths to which an enterprising fur kid will go to chomp on something yummy? Make sure to keep your pets away from the table and unattended plates of food, and be sure to secure the lids on garbage cans.

 

Toy Joy
Looking to stuff your pet’s stockings? Choose gifts that are safe.

  • Dogs have been known to tear their toys apart and swallowing the pieces, which can then become lodged in the esophagus, stomach or intestines. Stick with chew toys that are basically indestructible, Kongs that can be stuffed with healthy foods or chew treats that are designed to be safely digestible.
  • Long, stringy things are a feline’s dream, but the most risky toys for cats involve ribbon, yarn and loose little parts that can get stuck in the intestines, often necessitating surgery. Surprise kitty with a new ball that’s too big to swallow, a stuffed catnip toy or the interactive cat dancer—and tons of play sessions together.

 

 

Forget the Mistletoe & Holly

Holly, when ingested, can cause pets to suffer nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Mistletoe can cause gastrointestinal upset and cardiovascular problems. And many varieties of lilies, can cause kidney failure in cats if ingested.

Opt for just-as-jolly artificial plants made from silk or plastic, or choose a pet-safe bouquet.

Leave the Leftovers 

Fatty, spicy and no-no human foods, as well as bones, should not be fed to your furry friends. Pets can join the festivities in other fun ways that won’t lead to costly medical bills.

 

That Holiday Glow
Don’t leave lighted candles unattended. Pets may burn themselves or cause a fire if they knock candles over. Be sure to use appropriate candle holders, placed on a stable surface. And if you leave the room, put the candle out!

German Shorthaired Pointer Christmas edition

Wired Up 
Keep wires, batteries and glass or plastic ornaments out of paws’ reach. A wire can deliver a potentially lethal electrical shock and a punctured battery can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus, while shards of breakable ornaments can damage your pet’s mouth.

 

House Rules
If your animal-loving guests would like to give your pets a little extra attention and exercise while you’re busy tending to the party, ask them to feel free to start a nice play or petting session.

 

Put the Meds Away 

Make sure all of your medications are locked behind secure doors, and be sure to tell your guests to keep their meds zipped up and packed away, too.

 

Careful with Cocktails
If your celebration includes adult holiday beverages, be sure to place your unattended alcoholic drinks where pets cannot get to them. If ingested, your pet could become weak, ill and may even go into a coma, possibly resulting in death from respiratory failure.

 

A Room of Their Own 
Give your pet his own quiet space to retreat to—complete with fresh water and a place to snuggle. Shy pups and cats might want to hide out under a piece of furniture, in their carrying case or in a separate room away from the hubbub.

 

New Year’s Noise
As you count down to the new year, please keep in mind that strings of thrown confetti can get lodged in a cat’s intestines, if ingested, perhaps necessitating surgery. Noisy poppers can terrify pets and cause possible damage to sensitive ears.

 

Source: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/holiday-safety-tips

 

Orthopedic Surgery: Cruciate Ligament Repair

Cruciate Ligament Ruptures are among the most common injuries that dogs experience, but they are also serious and often painful as well! The veterinary teams at our Central Florida Vets animal hospitals—River Oaks Animal Hospital, Pet Care Center of Apopka, and East Lake Animal Clinic—are equipped to provide specialized orthopedic care for our patients who have experienced a cruciate ligament rupture or other serious knee injuries. The majority of our critical care cases are handled by our River Oaks Animal Hospital location as this facility is one of only a few hospitals in our area that has an oxygen chamber for post-surgical recovery.

What is a Cruciate Ligament Tear?

The cruciate ligament is the connective band of tissue, or the ligament, that connects the thigh bone with the lower leg bone and helps the knee to bend in a straight line. This can be disrupted, either stretched or torn, due to a genetic disposition toward this injury or because of an athletic activity that results in unstable footing or quick pivoting. It can also be caused by repetitive actions, and obesity is sometimes a factor in this type of injury as well.

Meet Sasha

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Just one week after surgery to repair a torn cruciate ligament, Sasha is walking well and weight bearing! Good job, Dr Greer. We so love this dog, who is so gentle. Nothing is more exciting than to see a dog come out of the cruciate ligament, or ACL, surgery, successfully and embark on a smooth recovery. Remember, each pet is an individual and their treatment and recovery from this type of condition will be different for everyone. We’ll be happy to discuss your pet’s personalized care with you. Please contact us with your questions!

Questions about Pet Obesity

At our Central Florida Vets practices, we are often asked about ongoing, at-home pet care. One of the most common concerns has to do with a healthy pet weight. Our most recent question was:

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Why is my dog so fat when I really don’t feed him very much?

 We are so glad that you’re looking to maintain your pet’s weight. Just like with humans, obesity has become a leading health issue for pets. When determining your pet’s dietary needs, it’s important to understand that:

  • Each brand of dog food will have a different caloric value per pound and you should know what yours is on the brand of food your pet eats.
  • Some foods may be higher in fat content. These will be the foods that your pet is more likely to like better. This is similar to the human desire for fast food!
  • Other factors that must be considered in dietary management are your pet’s:
    • Energy levels
    • Age
    • Living conditions

Once you understand these parts of your pet’s lifestyle, it’s important to evaluate the amount of food they eat daily and the amount of exercise they get. If your pet is not overeating and is getting adequate exercise and still looks like a football on legs, there may be another issue that is causing the weight gain. A metabolic disease can be the cause of this, but a condition of this type must be diagnosed through examination and blood tests. Weight issues can be caused by conditions such as an underactive thyroid or Cushings disease.

A River Oaks Animal Hospital Case Study

 Our veterinary team is currently working with a pet named Bonzo who is experiencing weight management issues. He is currently 67 pounds, but his healthy weight is only 15 pounds.

Bonzo’s case addresses another problem: how to lose weight.  In this case, there is an underlying disease, so we use medication and diet control. Bonzo’s food is strictly regulated and we have now started an exercise program.  With this amount of excess weight, we are aiming to boost the metabolism by splitting his meals into four portions and making sure that he walks before eating.  In other words, no energy input without energy output. We are aiming for a weight loss of about 1 to 2 pounds every ten days.

 

So far, we are on track and after a few days, Bonzo has been able to double his exercise.  The owner is committed to winning, and that is another important facet. Ignore the comments and stares you may get taking a very overweight dog to the dog park. You are doing the right thing. Overweight dogs have a higher chance of developing diabetes and joint disease.

Is Your Pet Overweight?

 If you are a pet owner with an overweight pet, talk to us. We would love to work with you to help determine the root cause, and more importantly, the treatment options available to get your pet back to their healthy weight. Remember, a healthy weight is essential for a long life!

 

 

Buster and the Eyelid Tumor Removal

Introducing our brave patient Buster! Just look at that sweet little face.

Buster

Buster recently was diagnosed with a tumor under his eyelid. Eyelid tumors are common in older dogs, and while the majority of these tend to be benign, or non-cancerous, it is important for them to be professionally evaluated. These tumors generally develop in the glands that line the eyelids. Often these tumors don’t cause a lot of problems, but they can be irritating to pets. If they are, removal is recommended.

Eyelid Tumor Removal

Generally, there are two different methods used for eyelid tumor removal, and the choice between one method and the other depends on the tumor itself. Veterinarians will often use a local anesthetic to remove as much of the tumor as possible, and then follow up with cryotherapy to remove the remainder of the tumor cells. The second method is often used when a tumor or growth is more aggressive and this involves sedating the patient and removing the tumor surgically.

At our Central Florida Vets practicesRiver Oaks Animal Hospital, Pet Care Center of Apopka, and East Lake Animal Clinic—we operate on a case-by-case basis, choosing methods of removal based on the individual pet’s needs and condition.

Sweet Buster’s Prognosis

After having a surgical removal of his eyelid tumor, Buster is doing well! His Mommy, who practices alternative therapies in her own workplace, has been using them on him to help him feel good as new and to speed up his healing process. We’re so glad Buster’s prognosis is looking good!

When is it Time to Say Goodbye to Your Pet?

LUCY GOOSEYThis is probably the most often asked question of us. It’s a tough subject but I hope this will help you, as like you, we have had to part from our dear friends, including 18 year old Lucy just two weeks ago. She was old in body, and a little older in mind(aren’t we all!) but from a general health point of view doing well…bloodwork was good just a week before she passed on. But realistically, I knew her quality of life was deteriorating, rapidly. I reached that stage when you wonder if you are prolonging life for your our selfishness.  You may be facing this now, but I really became sure that my absolute last boundary was when she no longer wanted to react or interact with us. I still give that advice to people. Trust me, you will know. That will be a look that may just show you..”hey, mom, I am just too tired to try any more “. And when the dreaded day comes. Be calm. Remember dogs live for the now. There is no fear of death. Ease your special friend on to his next journey and know he will be just around the corner…waiting for you to catch up.

Did I put to sleep? No. Lucy spared me that. I told her in no uncertain words that I just couldn’t do this, she would have to handle it in just the manner she handled everything else. With courage. The next day she died at home with heart failure.

For all you people facing this now…it will be alright. Give your pet every chance, but don’t hesitate if you know it is the right thing to do.

This article is dedicated to all those clients we have seen our veterinary hospitals that have been through this, and for every pet that we were honored to help whatever the problem. God bless you all.

Is Your Cat Missing the Litter Box?

You have a problem. Your cat is thinking outside the box, and not in a good way. You may be wondering what you did to inspire so much “creative expression.” Is your cat punishing you? Is Fluffy just “bad”? No, and no. House soiling and missing the litter box is a sign that your cat needs some help.
According to the Winn Feline Foundation, house soiling is the number one complaint among cat owners. The good news is that it is very treatable.
An accredited veterinarian can help you determine if the problem is medical or related to social or environmental stressors. In addition to a complete physical exam, the doctor will ask you specific “where and when” questions.
Health factors
Tony Buffington, DVM, PhD, a specialist in feline urinary disorders at The Ohio State University, and founder of the Indoor Cat Initiative says that many veterinarians recommend a urine test for every cat with a house soiling problem. The urinalysis will determine if blood, bacteria, or urinary crystals are present — signs that your cat might have feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD).
FLUTD is very common and can cause painful urination. Cats that begin to associate the litter box with pain will avoid it. Other medical possibilities include hyperthyroidism, kidney disease, diabetes, and arthritis and muscle or nerve disorders that might prevent your cat from getting to the litter box in time.
Environmental factors
If there is no medical cause, the next step is to look at environmental factors. Start with the litter box. Your cat might be avoiding the litter box because it is not cleaned well enough, you’ve changed the type of litter you use, or there is only one box for multiple cats.
Another possibility is that your cat is “marking” — spraying urine, typically on vertical objects such as walls and furniture, or in “socially significant” areas near doors or windows. Both male and female cats mark. The most common offenders are cats that have not been spayed or neutered. Buffington says that stress can cause elimination problems too. For example, subtle aggression or harassment by other house cats or neighborhood cats may be an issue.

More Information About Feline House Soiling
Even unremarkable changes in your home can make your cat anxious or fearful. Look around. Did anything change right before your cat started having problems? Did you get a new pet? A new couch? Maybe you just moved the old couch to a different part of the room, or had a dinner party. Cats are sensitive creatures and changes that seem small to you can throw your cat off his game. Check with your veterinarian about finding solutions that work for both you and your cat.

Labor Day Safety Tips for Pets

1. Do not apply any sunscreen or insect repellent product to your pet that is not labeled specifically for use on animals.
2. Always assign a dog guardian. No matter where you’re celebrating, be sure to assign a friend or member of the family to keep an eye on your pooch-especially if you’re not in a fenced-in yard or other secure area.
3. Made in the shade. Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water, and make sure they have a shady place to escape the sun.
4. Always keep matches and lighter fluid out of paws’ reach. Certain types of matches contain chlorates, which could potentially damage blood cells and result in difficulty breathing-or even kidney disease in severe cases.
5. Keep your pet on his normal diet. Any change, even for one meal, can give your pet severe indigestion and diarrhea.
6. Keep citronella candles, insect coils and oil products out of reach. Ingesting any of these items can produce stomach irritation and possibly even central nervous system depression in your pets, and if inhaled, the oils could cause aspiration pneumonia.
7. Never leave your dog alone in the car. Traveling with your dog means occasionally you’ll make stops in places where he’s not permitted. Be sure to rotate dog walking duties between family members, and never leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle.
8. Make a safe splash. Don’t leave pets unsupervised around a pool-not all dogs are good swimmers.

Car Sickness In Pets

 Does your dog throw up in the car when you go for rides? He may be experiencing typical motion sickness, just like some people do. Motion sickness usually begins very shortly after starting the car ride. The dog will begin to drool and then vomit. It’s not serious, but certainly not something that we like to clean up! To solve the problem, first try acclimating the dog to car rides. Do this by simply putting him in the car for a few minutes each day without going anywhere. Then try just going down the driveway and back, and the next day going around the block. Gradually build up the distance and time the dog rides in the car. 

 Sometimes this will help to decrease the dog’s anxiety over riding in the car and may help to decrease vomiting. If that doesn’t work, there are some over-the-counter medications you can try. The medication will need to be given about an hour before the car ride. Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation as to what drug to try and the dosage for your pet.
(Never give any medications to your pet without your veterinarian’s advice!) These drugs are safe, with drowsiness usually the only major side effect. But since your dog isn’t driving the car, that shouldn’t be a problem! If over-the-counter drugs don’t work, your veterinarian may be able to suggest another method for curing the car sickness.